tickitaly
sightseeing, not queueing
 

Domus Aurea (Nero's House, Rome)

Simply select the ideal date for your visit by clicking on the calendar.

Once you've selected a date on the calendar we'll show you the ticket options that are available, one or more of which may be of interest to you.

October 2014 and, after eight years it is finally possible to see some of this incredible place, albeit it in a limited fashion for the time being.

Restoration is ongoing (2018 is the projected time for all works to be finished) but at least there's now the possibility of seeing how things are progressing, as part of an official guided tour. Work largely stops at weekends and we're able to offer limited spaces on guided tours on Saturdays and Sundays. Please click on the calendar to see what's currently available.

Please be sure to wear appropriate footwear and also take along a warm jacket, for the high levels of humidity underground as much as anything else.

Visitor information for the Domus Aurea, Rome


Domus Aurea & Circus Maximus Exclusive Tour (3 hours 15 minutes)

'Works in progress', a new tour that takes you on a journey of discovery to two of the most fascinating sites of Ancient Rome. The tour highlights are:

  • Interior - the remains of the Circus Maximus, home of chariot races and capable of holding over 350,000 spectators.
  • Results of ongoing excavation works that hope to eventually reveal the original racing track, still 30ft below surface.
  • Stand in the place where Nero's fire began.
  • Exterior - en route to the Domus, pass by the Colosseum, the Palatine area, and the Ludus Magnus, the gladiator training school.
  • Interior - a fully guided tour to view ongoing restoration works at the Domus Aurea.
  • New tour highlights include multimedia presentations and 3D immersive technology (virtual reality headsets).

This tour takes you on a journey of discovery into two of the most impressive archaeological sites of Rome, both still undergoing restoration.

Tours head off at 10.00 AM and the first part of the tour lasts around two hours - you'll get to the Domus Aurea just before 12.00 PM for the tour there, a tour lasting around 75 minutes. The total running time, then, is roughly three hours and fifteen minutes - tours are in English and the group size is no more than 25 people.

We start with the remains of the Circus Maximus: the ancient world’s biggest entertainment complex lies in a valley between the Palatine and the Aventine hills. According to tradition, it was first built in the VI century BC, then enlarged on several occasions: significant works were carried out by Julius Caesar in 46 BC. It was primarily used for chariot races (the most popular spectacle in ancient Rome, memorably portrayed in the 1959 Hollywood blockbuster Ben Hur), but also for athletic competitions, wild animal fights and public events such as the triumphal procession awarded to victorious generals. It could accommodate from 150,000 to 250,000 spectators. The circus was destroyed by Nero’s fire in AD 64 and then rebuilt. The extant ruins date back to the imperial era.

The imposing oblong circus (600 metres long) was rounded at one end and straight at the other. The curved east end has recently been opened to the public, after excavations completed in 2016. You'll wander through the brick-built remains of the galleries that once led to the tiers of seating, with rooms used as brothels, bars and betting shops; the excavations brought to light part of a Roman road and fragments of a triumphal arch - the biggest of the time - built in AD 81 to commemorate the victory of the emperor Titus over the Jews. According to archaeologists, there is plenty more to discover, including the original chariot racing course - spina - still buried nearly 30 feet underground.

It was here, at the curved end, that Nero’s fire started on July 18th AD 64: much of the city was destroyed and the emperor used the devastation of the fire in order to create new buidings, including his residence: the Domus Aurea (Golden House).

Most of the extant monuments of ancient Rome were built after that fire. On our way to Nero’s house you'll pass in front of some of them: the Colosseum (inaugurated by Titus in AD 80) and the Ludus Magnus, the principal training-school for gladiators built by Domitian (81-96) over the remains of houses destroyed by the Great Fire.

Next it's on to a fully guided tour to view ongoing restoration works at the Domus Aurea, Rome. The tour lasts approximately 75 minutes. You'll be accompanied by an official guide - your guide for the first part of the tour will accompany you to the Domus and then bid you farewell.

The tours are now even more special thanks to the introduction of multimedia presentations and 3D immersive technology that will give you the most amazing insights into the history of, and day to day happenings in, the Domus Aurea.

Please note that the 3D Oculus Rift headsets that are used as part of the virtual-reality time machine are not intended for prolonged use by children under the ages of 13, nor for anyone suffering from epilepsy or any serious eye conditions. Any and all multimedia commentaries are, for now, in English and Italian only.

Domus Aurea guided tour (includes e-book guide)

A fully guided tour to view ongoing restoration works at the Domus Aurea, Rome. The tour lasts approximately 75 minutes and is available in English, French or Spanish on Saturdays and Sundays only. Group sizes are restricted to 23 visitors and you'll be accompanied at all times by an official guide.
The tour also includes a downloadable ebook guide in PDF, mobi and epub formats.

As of February 2017 the tours are even more special thanks to the introduction of multimedia presentations and 3D immersive technology that will give you the most amazing insights into the history of, and day to day happenings in, the Domus Aurea.

Please note that the 3D Oculus Rift headsets that are used as part of the virtual-reality time machine are not intended for prolonged use by children under the ages of 13, nor for anyone suffering from epilepsy or any serious eye conditions. Any and all multimedia commentaries are, for now, in English and Italian only.

4.8 stars out of 5 from 276 ratings. See all 204 reviews

5 stars
ZJ, Hungary
7th May 2018
It was wonderful. We did not get tickets for our voucher though. The crew talked in italian, so I didn't understand, but it seemed they were not aware we were coming. They did let us visit the place without any bad word, though.
5 stars
AF, Switzerland
28th Apr 2018
Es war etwas Seltenes und Ausgezeichnetes!
5 stars
OP, United States
21st Apr 2018
Wonderful. The archeologists had revealed so much more than I saw in 2007. I feel so fortunate that my daughter and I could see Domus Aurea now. We both have art history backgrounds and full appreciate the influence Domus Aurea had on European painting from the renaissance on. Also, the scale of the spaces is fascinating. We enjoyed the virtual reality presentation too.
5 stars
JJ, United States
9th Apr 2018
Enjoyed very much
5 stars
HB, United Kingdom (Great Britain)
3rd Apr 2018
Outstanding in every way. Extremely knowledgeable and enthusiastic guide, care over safety, punctual
5 stars
MW, Australia
15th Mar 2018
excellent, one of the best archaeological sites/tours in Europe


After many years of being closed due to instability, many areas of the Domus Aurea - Nero's Golden House in Rome - are once more open to visitors. Restoration work is ongoing and, until works are finished, these tours only run at weekends.
A fully-guided tour (that also includes some state-of-the-art virtual reality elements) is run by our own expert guides - you can get a glimpse of what to expect in this short video.

Domus Aurea