The Uffizi Gallery, Florence - information & booking

Reserve Uffizi Gallery tickets

Uffizi guided tours

Ticket types, opening times, how to gain admission


The Uffizi, Florence, Italy - visitor information

A visit to the Uffizi Gallery is pretty much obligatory for visitors to Florence; you may be staying in Florence proper, in which case you'll have several bites at the cherry, or you may well have set aside just one or two days. In either case you can, under the best of circumstances, figure on an hour or two standing in the queue, and it's not unheard of for people to be queuing for three or four hours!

Why risk any of this? Several hours will enable you to do some serious wandering around the city, so why waste any of that time by standing in a queue? Incidentally, if you're looking for a hotel, check this listing of Florence hotels.

The Galleria degli Uffizi is the most visited (over 1.5 million people a year, closely followed by Michelangelo's David) tourist attraction in Florence, and is home to the finest collection of paintings and pictures in Italy - it is undoubtedly one of the finest museums in the world.

The building is a Renaissance palace by Vasari (1560) and was once home to the offices (hence 'Uffizi') of the Medicis' administration. The building is 'U' shaped, the closed end looking out over the river Arno and the other end opening onto Palazzo della Signoria. Once Vasari had died, building and extension work continued, with each successive member of the Medici clan adding to the increasingly rich treasure trove of the family's art collection. With the death and will of Anna Maria Lodovica, the enormous collection was bequeathed to the people of Florence, with the condition that it never be allowed to leave the city.

UffiziUffizi Gallery, Florence

During the nineteenth century the vast bulk of the statuary was moved from the Uffizi to the Bargello museum (still in Florence), whilst many other antiquities went to the Museo Archeologico. What remained is a breathtaking collection of paintings and as smaller selection of sculpture.

Most people leave the Uffizi vowing to return - there simply isn't enough time to do it justice in one visit. Be warned that you'll often find rooms, sometimes large sections, of the gallery closed, but you're unlikely to leave feeling short-changed.
We have a page here about progress on Uffizi Gallery expansion - 'Progetto dei Nuovo Uffizi'

Uffizi interiorUffizi interior

Below is a rough floorplan of the Uffizi Gallery; underneath it you'll find a key showing you what to expect to see in each of the rooms.

Plan of the Uffizi
Room 1 - Archaeological room
Room 2 - Giotto and 13th Century
Room 3 - Sienese painting 14th Century
Room 4 - Florentine painting 14th Century
Room 5/6 - International Gothic
Room 7 - Early Renaissance
Room 8 - Filippo Lippi
Room 9 - Antonio del Pollaiolo
Room 10/14 - Botticelli
Room 15 - Leonardo
Room 16 - Geographic Maps room
Room 17 - Ermafrodito
Room 18 - The Tribune
Room 19 - Perugino and Signorelli
Room 20 - Dürer and German Artists
Room 21 - Giambellino and Giorgione
Room 22 - Flemish and German Painting
Room 23 - Correggio
Room 24 - Miniatures room
Room 25 - Michelangelo and Florentine Artists
Room 26 - Raffaello and Andrea del Sarto
Room 27 - Pontormo and Rosso Fiorentino
Room 28 - Tiziano and Sebastiano del Piombo
Room 29 - Parmigianino and Dosso Dossi
Room 30 - Emilian Painting
Room 31 - Veronese
Room 32 - Tintoretto
Room 33 - 16th Century Painting
Room 34 - Lombard School
Room 35 - Barocci
Room 38 - Buontalenti Vestibule
Room 41 - Rubens
Room 42 - Niobe
Room 43 - Caravaggio
Room 44 - Rembrandt
Room 45 - XVIII Century

Upon request we are able to organise guided tours of the Accademia (as well as other Florence art museums) - please click here for details.

You may view a location map here, a fully zoomable Google Map here, and click here for the Uffizi Gallery section of our blog, with news of exhibitions, special openings (and closures), reviews and comments. One blog post that may be of interest is the list of Uffizi rules and regulations, handily answering your 'may I take photographs in the Uffizi Gallery?' type of question. And the answer to that is that yes, you may, but not using flash photography!

Reserve Uffizi Gallery tickets

Uffizi guided tours

Ticket types, opening times, how to gain admission


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